wr3n:

C C Club on a rainy night

84ability:

#magichour #minneapolis #minnesota #cityscape #southsiders #throughthefence

Northwood Park, New Hope Northwood Park, New Hope Northwood Park, New Hope Northwood Park, New Hope

Northwood Park, New Hope

littlefreegingerreads:

This is not a post about Hobbits, a golden ring or the journey to Middle Earth. Sorry. I just watched Lord of the Rings last night and somehow that is the title that stuck in my head. This is a post though about me. And my Little Free Library. My journey to getting my LFL up and out in the…

ski-u-mah:

This Sunday is maroon & gold day at the State Fair! Stop by the U of M building and show us your #GopherPride!! (at Minnesota State Fairgrounds)

takeme-onanadventure:

the great minnesota get together!


i feel like i never post my own photographs on here. gonna have to do that more often. takeme-onanadventure:

the great minnesota get together!


i feel like i never post my own photographs on here. gonna have to do that more often. takeme-onanadventure:

the great minnesota get together!


i feel like i never post my own photographs on here. gonna have to do that more often.

takeme-onanadventure:

the great minnesota get together!


i feel like i never post my own photographs on here. gonna have to do that more often.

hclib:

Discovering the Fascinating Past of 1421 5th St. NE
A few years ago I lived down the block from a house with one odd architectural feature: above the doorway was a large piece of stone with “MRS A H WALSTEN - AD 1900” carved into it. I’d always wondered who exactly Mrs. A. H. Walsten was — the sort of person who carves their name into stone usually seems like the sort of person with a good story behind them. I decided to do a little digging this summer.
My first step was to look at the old building permit card for the house (formerly 1427 5th St. NE, now 1421 5th St. NE). It referenced a “Hannah Walsten” which gave me more of a name to go off of. Next I took a look at the digitized city directories to see if I could find any listings by that name. I found a reference to an “August Walsten” living there in 1900 and a “Mrs. Hannah M Walsten, midwife” living there in 1901 but not much else by that specific name. Next I decided to try a slightly different resource: the digitized issues of the Minneapolis Journal from the early 1900s. Maybe I could find a reference to their marriage? Or a real estate transaction for the house?
I ended up coming across much more than I anticipated! It turns out Mrs. Hannah Walsten had gone by five different names and been married to four different men (including August H. Walsten on two separate occasions). This came to light when she was arrested for performing a “criminal operation” (an abortion). She had been running what was referred to at the time as a “baby farm” (essentially an unlicensed orphanage) out of her home.
The old Minneapolis Journal had multiple stories detailing her trial and the various dramatic scenes which unfolded in court. She was ultimately found guilty — one story said she was the first woman to be successfully convicted of performing an abortion in Hennepin County — and sentenced to 28 months in Stillwater Prison.
_____________
This post was researched and written by Special Collections volunteer Nick Steffel. Photos of the house were taken by Nick. hclib:

Discovering the Fascinating Past of 1421 5th St. NE
A few years ago I lived down the block from a house with one odd architectural feature: above the doorway was a large piece of stone with “MRS A H WALSTEN - AD 1900” carved into it. I’d always wondered who exactly Mrs. A. H. Walsten was — the sort of person who carves their name into stone usually seems like the sort of person with a good story behind them. I decided to do a little digging this summer.
My first step was to look at the old building permit card for the house (formerly 1427 5th St. NE, now 1421 5th St. NE). It referenced a “Hannah Walsten” which gave me more of a name to go off of. Next I took a look at the digitized city directories to see if I could find any listings by that name. I found a reference to an “August Walsten” living there in 1900 and a “Mrs. Hannah M Walsten, midwife” living there in 1901 but not much else by that specific name. Next I decided to try a slightly different resource: the digitized issues of the Minneapolis Journal from the early 1900s. Maybe I could find a reference to their marriage? Or a real estate transaction for the house?
I ended up coming across much more than I anticipated! It turns out Mrs. Hannah Walsten had gone by five different names and been married to four different men (including August H. Walsten on two separate occasions). This came to light when she was arrested for performing a “criminal operation” (an abortion). She had been running what was referred to at the time as a “baby farm” (essentially an unlicensed orphanage) out of her home.
The old Minneapolis Journal had multiple stories detailing her trial and the various dramatic scenes which unfolded in court. She was ultimately found guilty — one story said she was the first woman to be successfully convicted of performing an abortion in Hennepin County — and sentenced to 28 months in Stillwater Prison.
_____________
This post was researched and written by Special Collections volunteer Nick Steffel. Photos of the house were taken by Nick. hclib:

Discovering the Fascinating Past of 1421 5th St. NE
A few years ago I lived down the block from a house with one odd architectural feature: above the doorway was a large piece of stone with “MRS A H WALSTEN - AD 1900” carved into it. I’d always wondered who exactly Mrs. A. H. Walsten was — the sort of person who carves their name into stone usually seems like the sort of person with a good story behind them. I decided to do a little digging this summer.
My first step was to look at the old building permit card for the house (formerly 1427 5th St. NE, now 1421 5th St. NE). It referenced a “Hannah Walsten” which gave me more of a name to go off of. Next I took a look at the digitized city directories to see if I could find any listings by that name. I found a reference to an “August Walsten” living there in 1900 and a “Mrs. Hannah M Walsten, midwife” living there in 1901 but not much else by that specific name. Next I decided to try a slightly different resource: the digitized issues of the Minneapolis Journal from the early 1900s. Maybe I could find a reference to their marriage? Or a real estate transaction for the house?
I ended up coming across much more than I anticipated! It turns out Mrs. Hannah Walsten had gone by five different names and been married to four different men (including August H. Walsten on two separate occasions). This came to light when she was arrested for performing a “criminal operation” (an abortion). She had been running what was referred to at the time as a “baby farm” (essentially an unlicensed orphanage) out of her home.
The old Minneapolis Journal had multiple stories detailing her trial and the various dramatic scenes which unfolded in court. She was ultimately found guilty — one story said she was the first woman to be successfully convicted of performing an abortion in Hennepin County — and sentenced to 28 months in Stillwater Prison.
_____________
This post was researched and written by Special Collections volunteer Nick Steffel. Photos of the house were taken by Nick.

hclib:

Discovering the Fascinating Past of 1421 5th St. NE

A few years ago I lived down the block from a house with one odd architectural feature: above the doorway was a large piece of stone with “MRS A H WALSTEN - AD 1900” carved into it. I’d always wondered who exactly Mrs. A. H. Walsten was — the sort of person who carves their name into stone usually seems like the sort of person with a good story behind them. I decided to do a little digging this summer.

My first step was to look at the old building permit card for the house (formerly 1427 5th St. NE, now 1421 5th St. NE). It referenced a “Hannah Walsten” which gave me more of a name to go off of. Next I took a look at the digitized city directories to see if I could find any listings by that name. I found a reference to an “August Walsten” living there in 1900 and a “Mrs. Hannah M Walsten, midwife” living there in 1901 but not much else by that specific name. Next I decided to try a slightly different resource: the digitized issues of the Minneapolis Journal from the early 1900s. Maybe I could find a reference to their marriage? Or a real estate transaction for the house?

I ended up coming across much more than I anticipated! It turns out Mrs. Hannah Walsten had gone by five different names and been married to four different men (including August H. Walsten on two separate occasions). This came to light when she was arrested for performing a “criminal operation” (an abortion). She had been running what was referred to at the time as a “baby farm” (essentially an unlicensed orphanage) out of her home.

The old Minneapolis Journal had multiple stories detailing her trial and the various dramatic scenes which unfolded in court. She was ultimately found guilty — one story said she was the first woman to be successfully convicted of performing an abortion in Hennepin County — and sentenced to 28 months in Stillwater Prison.

_____________

This post was researched and written by Special Collections volunteer Nick Steffel. Photos of the house were taken by Nick.

thecabooze:

Check out this gem we found! John Hanson with the old Cabooze Mural! 

  1. Camera: HP Photosmart 7520 series

oldandgoldmn:

Gopher volleyball opens its season tonight with the Big Ten/ACC Challenge. The game programs will look a little different than this 1987 media guide…

poeticnobellandmermaid:

Forgot to post this, I took this back in the beginning of August. Love Minneapolis.