wr3n:

Lee’s Liquor

troutcycle:

Right place, right time.
#minneapolis #summer #beach #sunset (at Hidden Beach)

minnepixel:

Downtown Minneapolis HDR from the warehouse district.

  1. Camera: Canon EOS REBEL T4i
  2. Aperture: f/16
  3. Exposure: 1/100th
  4. Focal Length: 27mm

Another one of the last few remaining Brookdale animal parking lot signs.
#Brookdale #BrooklynCenter #Minnesota #Minneapolis #TwinCities #crocodile #alligator

matt-barber58:

Over and Under

  1. Camera: Nikon D7000
  2. Aperture: f/22
  3. Exposure: 5"
  4. Focal Length: 24mm
hclib:

The Minneapolis Aquatennial Celebrates 75 Years

On May 24, 1939, a group of Twin Cities businessmen conceived the idea of the Minneapolis Aquatennial at a parade for the visiting King of England in Winnipeg. They were inspired by the fact that hundreds of thousands of people would attend a parade on a rainy day to see a king. Thus, they decided to stage their own local celebration, create their own royalty, and celebrate summer in Minneapolis.
They chose the first (and present) dates of the Aquatennial by researching weather data back to 1898 and determined that the third week of July offered the safest weather for a parade. It didn’t rain on the Aquatennial parades the first year or for 10 years to follow. But for added security, Aquatennial officials asked a local group of Catholic nuns, the Little Sisters of the Poor, to pray for good weather each year.
- from a Minneapolis Aquatennial Association press pack, 1989.

The Minneapolis Aquatennial, in its 75th year, continues the tradition of celebrating summer in Minneapolis with sporting events around the lakes and rivers, music, fireworks, arts, food, games, and more. Royalty is also a key element of the Aquatennial—the concept on which the festival is based.
Check out the events at this year’s Aquatennial, July 18-26, 2014.
_____________
A selection of programs from the Minneapolis Aquatennial Collection: 1940, 1948, 1952 (2 programs), 1961, 1966, 1975, and 1989. Visit Special Collections to view more programs in the collection in addition to newspaper clippings, press material, photographs, scrapbooks, and memorabilia. hclib:

The Minneapolis Aquatennial Celebrates 75 Years

On May 24, 1939, a group of Twin Cities businessmen conceived the idea of the Minneapolis Aquatennial at a parade for the visiting King of England in Winnipeg. They were inspired by the fact that hundreds of thousands of people would attend a parade on a rainy day to see a king. Thus, they decided to stage their own local celebration, create their own royalty, and celebrate summer in Minneapolis.
They chose the first (and present) dates of the Aquatennial by researching weather data back to 1898 and determined that the third week of July offered the safest weather for a parade. It didn’t rain on the Aquatennial parades the first year or for 10 years to follow. But for added security, Aquatennial officials asked a local group of Catholic nuns, the Little Sisters of the Poor, to pray for good weather each year.
- from a Minneapolis Aquatennial Association press pack, 1989.

The Minneapolis Aquatennial, in its 75th year, continues the tradition of celebrating summer in Minneapolis with sporting events around the lakes and rivers, music, fireworks, arts, food, games, and more. Royalty is also a key element of the Aquatennial—the concept on which the festival is based.
Check out the events at this year’s Aquatennial, July 18-26, 2014.
_____________
A selection of programs from the Minneapolis Aquatennial Collection: 1940, 1948, 1952 (2 programs), 1961, 1966, 1975, and 1989. Visit Special Collections to view more programs in the collection in addition to newspaper clippings, press material, photographs, scrapbooks, and memorabilia. hclib:

The Minneapolis Aquatennial Celebrates 75 Years

On May 24, 1939, a group of Twin Cities businessmen conceived the idea of the Minneapolis Aquatennial at a parade for the visiting King of England in Winnipeg. They were inspired by the fact that hundreds of thousands of people would attend a parade on a rainy day to see a king. Thus, they decided to stage their own local celebration, create their own royalty, and celebrate summer in Minneapolis.
They chose the first (and present) dates of the Aquatennial by researching weather data back to 1898 and determined that the third week of July offered the safest weather for a parade. It didn’t rain on the Aquatennial parades the first year or for 10 years to follow. But for added security, Aquatennial officials asked a local group of Catholic nuns, the Little Sisters of the Poor, to pray for good weather each year.
- from a Minneapolis Aquatennial Association press pack, 1989.

The Minneapolis Aquatennial, in its 75th year, continues the tradition of celebrating summer in Minneapolis with sporting events around the lakes and rivers, music, fireworks, arts, food, games, and more. Royalty is also a key element of the Aquatennial—the concept on which the festival is based.
Check out the events at this year’s Aquatennial, July 18-26, 2014.
_____________
A selection of programs from the Minneapolis Aquatennial Collection: 1940, 1948, 1952 (2 programs), 1961, 1966, 1975, and 1989. Visit Special Collections to view more programs in the collection in addition to newspaper clippings, press material, photographs, scrapbooks, and memorabilia. hclib:

The Minneapolis Aquatennial Celebrates 75 Years

On May 24, 1939, a group of Twin Cities businessmen conceived the idea of the Minneapolis Aquatennial at a parade for the visiting King of England in Winnipeg. They were inspired by the fact that hundreds of thousands of people would attend a parade on a rainy day to see a king. Thus, they decided to stage their own local celebration, create their own royalty, and celebrate summer in Minneapolis.
They chose the first (and present) dates of the Aquatennial by researching weather data back to 1898 and determined that the third week of July offered the safest weather for a parade. It didn’t rain on the Aquatennial parades the first year or for 10 years to follow. But for added security, Aquatennial officials asked a local group of Catholic nuns, the Little Sisters of the Poor, to pray for good weather each year.
- from a Minneapolis Aquatennial Association press pack, 1989.

The Minneapolis Aquatennial, in its 75th year, continues the tradition of celebrating summer in Minneapolis with sporting events around the lakes and rivers, music, fireworks, arts, food, games, and more. Royalty is also a key element of the Aquatennial—the concept on which the festival is based.
Check out the events at this year’s Aquatennial, July 18-26, 2014.
_____________
A selection of programs from the Minneapolis Aquatennial Collection: 1940, 1948, 1952 (2 programs), 1961, 1966, 1975, and 1989. Visit Special Collections to view more programs in the collection in addition to newspaper clippings, press material, photographs, scrapbooks, and memorabilia. hclib:

The Minneapolis Aquatennial Celebrates 75 Years

On May 24, 1939, a group of Twin Cities businessmen conceived the idea of the Minneapolis Aquatennial at a parade for the visiting King of England in Winnipeg. They were inspired by the fact that hundreds of thousands of people would attend a parade on a rainy day to see a king. Thus, they decided to stage their own local celebration, create their own royalty, and celebrate summer in Minneapolis.
They chose the first (and present) dates of the Aquatennial by researching weather data back to 1898 and determined that the third week of July offered the safest weather for a parade. It didn’t rain on the Aquatennial parades the first year or for 10 years to follow. But for added security, Aquatennial officials asked a local group of Catholic nuns, the Little Sisters of the Poor, to pray for good weather each year.
- from a Minneapolis Aquatennial Association press pack, 1989.

The Minneapolis Aquatennial, in its 75th year, continues the tradition of celebrating summer in Minneapolis with sporting events around the lakes and rivers, music, fireworks, arts, food, games, and more. Royalty is also a key element of the Aquatennial—the concept on which the festival is based.
Check out the events at this year’s Aquatennial, July 18-26, 2014.
_____________
A selection of programs from the Minneapolis Aquatennial Collection: 1940, 1948, 1952 (2 programs), 1961, 1966, 1975, and 1989. Visit Special Collections to view more programs in the collection in addition to newspaper clippings, press material, photographs, scrapbooks, and memorabilia. hclib:

The Minneapolis Aquatennial Celebrates 75 Years

On May 24, 1939, a group of Twin Cities businessmen conceived the idea of the Minneapolis Aquatennial at a parade for the visiting King of England in Winnipeg. They were inspired by the fact that hundreds of thousands of people would attend a parade on a rainy day to see a king. Thus, they decided to stage their own local celebration, create their own royalty, and celebrate summer in Minneapolis.
They chose the first (and present) dates of the Aquatennial by researching weather data back to 1898 and determined that the third week of July offered the safest weather for a parade. It didn’t rain on the Aquatennial parades the first year or for 10 years to follow. But for added security, Aquatennial officials asked a local group of Catholic nuns, the Little Sisters of the Poor, to pray for good weather each year.
- from a Minneapolis Aquatennial Association press pack, 1989.

The Minneapolis Aquatennial, in its 75th year, continues the tradition of celebrating summer in Minneapolis with sporting events around the lakes and rivers, music, fireworks, arts, food, games, and more. Royalty is also a key element of the Aquatennial—the concept on which the festival is based.
Check out the events at this year’s Aquatennial, July 18-26, 2014.
_____________
A selection of programs from the Minneapolis Aquatennial Collection: 1940, 1948, 1952 (2 programs), 1961, 1966, 1975, and 1989. Visit Special Collections to view more programs in the collection in addition to newspaper clippings, press material, photographs, scrapbooks, and memorabilia. hclib:

The Minneapolis Aquatennial Celebrates 75 Years

On May 24, 1939, a group of Twin Cities businessmen conceived the idea of the Minneapolis Aquatennial at a parade for the visiting King of England in Winnipeg. They were inspired by the fact that hundreds of thousands of people would attend a parade on a rainy day to see a king. Thus, they decided to stage their own local celebration, create their own royalty, and celebrate summer in Minneapolis.
They chose the first (and present) dates of the Aquatennial by researching weather data back to 1898 and determined that the third week of July offered the safest weather for a parade. It didn’t rain on the Aquatennial parades the first year or for 10 years to follow. But for added security, Aquatennial officials asked a local group of Catholic nuns, the Little Sisters of the Poor, to pray for good weather each year.
- from a Minneapolis Aquatennial Association press pack, 1989.

The Minneapolis Aquatennial, in its 75th year, continues the tradition of celebrating summer in Minneapolis with sporting events around the lakes and rivers, music, fireworks, arts, food, games, and more. Royalty is also a key element of the Aquatennial—the concept on which the festival is based.
Check out the events at this year’s Aquatennial, July 18-26, 2014.
_____________
A selection of programs from the Minneapolis Aquatennial Collection: 1940, 1948, 1952 (2 programs), 1961, 1966, 1975, and 1989. Visit Special Collections to view more programs in the collection in addition to newspaper clippings, press material, photographs, scrapbooks, and memorabilia. hclib:

The Minneapolis Aquatennial Celebrates 75 Years

On May 24, 1939, a group of Twin Cities businessmen conceived the idea of the Minneapolis Aquatennial at a parade for the visiting King of England in Winnipeg. They were inspired by the fact that hundreds of thousands of people would attend a parade on a rainy day to see a king. Thus, they decided to stage their own local celebration, create their own royalty, and celebrate summer in Minneapolis.
They chose the first (and present) dates of the Aquatennial by researching weather data back to 1898 and determined that the third week of July offered the safest weather for a parade. It didn’t rain on the Aquatennial parades the first year or for 10 years to follow. But for added security, Aquatennial officials asked a local group of Catholic nuns, the Little Sisters of the Poor, to pray for good weather each year.
- from a Minneapolis Aquatennial Association press pack, 1989.

The Minneapolis Aquatennial, in its 75th year, continues the tradition of celebrating summer in Minneapolis with sporting events around the lakes and rivers, music, fireworks, arts, food, games, and more. Royalty is also a key element of the Aquatennial—the concept on which the festival is based.
Check out the events at this year’s Aquatennial, July 18-26, 2014.
_____________
A selection of programs from the Minneapolis Aquatennial Collection: 1940, 1948, 1952 (2 programs), 1961, 1966, 1975, and 1989. Visit Special Collections to view more programs in the collection in addition to newspaper clippings, press material, photographs, scrapbooks, and memorabilia.

hclib:

The Minneapolis Aquatennial Celebrates 75 Years

On May 24, 1939, a group of Twin Cities businessmen conceived the idea of the Minneapolis Aquatennial at a parade for the visiting King of England in Winnipeg. They were inspired by the fact that hundreds of thousands of people would attend a parade on a rainy day to see a king. Thus, they decided to stage their own local celebration, create their own royalty, and celebrate summer in Minneapolis.

They chose the first (and present) dates of the Aquatennial by researching weather data back to 1898 and determined that the third week of July offered the safest weather for a parade. It didn’t rain on the Aquatennial parades the first year or for 10 years to follow. But for added security, Aquatennial officials asked a local group of Catholic nuns, the Little Sisters of the Poor, to pray for good weather each year.

- from a Minneapolis Aquatennial Association press pack, 1989.

The Minneapolis Aquatennial, in its 75th year, continues the tradition of celebrating summer in Minneapolis with sporting events around the lakes and rivers, music, fireworks, arts, food, games, and more. Royalty is also a key element of the Aquatennial—the concept on which the festival is based.

Check out the events at this year’s Aquatennial, July 18-26, 2014.

_____________

A selection of programs from the Minneapolis Aquatennial Collection: 1940, 1948, 1952 (2 programs), 1961, 1966, 1975, and 1989. Visit Special Collections to view more programs in the collection in addition to newspaper clippings, press material, photographs, scrapbooks, and memorabilia.

wr3n:

Mpls reflections

jemspark:

Minnehaha Park, along the river trail

893thecurrent:

In an Eat Street space that used to house a German bakery, Arwyn Birch and Teresa Fox have made their own mark on the culinary scene in Minneapolis; the vibrant, pink-ceilinged Glam Doll Donuts sells about two dozen different types of doughnuts, including a new one every Wednesday, and they craft custom designs for special events. Among the secrets to their success has been enthusiastic outreach to the local music scene, which has responded with lots of goodwill and countless social media shout-outs.
read more about the people who recreated CHVRCHES’ album cover as a doughnut 893thecurrent:

In an Eat Street space that used to house a German bakery, Arwyn Birch and Teresa Fox have made their own mark on the culinary scene in Minneapolis; the vibrant, pink-ceilinged Glam Doll Donuts sells about two dozen different types of doughnuts, including a new one every Wednesday, and they craft custom designs for special events. Among the secrets to their success has been enthusiastic outreach to the local music scene, which has responded with lots of goodwill and countless social media shout-outs.
read more about the people who recreated CHVRCHES’ album cover as a doughnut 893thecurrent:

In an Eat Street space that used to house a German bakery, Arwyn Birch and Teresa Fox have made their own mark on the culinary scene in Minneapolis; the vibrant, pink-ceilinged Glam Doll Donuts sells about two dozen different types of doughnuts, including a new one every Wednesday, and they craft custom designs for special events. Among the secrets to their success has been enthusiastic outreach to the local music scene, which has responded with lots of goodwill and countless social media shout-outs.
read more about the people who recreated CHVRCHES’ album cover as a doughnut 893thecurrent:

In an Eat Street space that used to house a German bakery, Arwyn Birch and Teresa Fox have made their own mark on the culinary scene in Minneapolis; the vibrant, pink-ceilinged Glam Doll Donuts sells about two dozen different types of doughnuts, including a new one every Wednesday, and they craft custom designs for special events. Among the secrets to their success has been enthusiastic outreach to the local music scene, which has responded with lots of goodwill and countless social media shout-outs.
read more about the people who recreated CHVRCHES’ album cover as a doughnut 893thecurrent:

In an Eat Street space that used to house a German bakery, Arwyn Birch and Teresa Fox have made their own mark on the culinary scene in Minneapolis; the vibrant, pink-ceilinged Glam Doll Donuts sells about two dozen different types of doughnuts, including a new one every Wednesday, and they craft custom designs for special events. Among the secrets to their success has been enthusiastic outreach to the local music scene, which has responded with lots of goodwill and countless social media shout-outs.
read more about the people who recreated CHVRCHES’ album cover as a doughnut

893thecurrent:

In an Eat Street space that used to house a German bakery, Arwyn Birch and Teresa Fox have made their own mark on the culinary scene in Minneapolis; the vibrant, pink-ceilinged Glam Doll Donuts sells about two dozen different types of doughnuts, including a new one every Wednesday, and they craft custom designs for special events. Among the secrets to their success has been enthusiastic outreach to the local music scene, which has responded with lots of goodwill and countless social media shout-outs.

read more about the people who recreated CHVRCHES’ album cover as a doughnut

893thecurrent:

Minneapolis could soon have a new hive center for music education and appreciation thanks to a plan currently in the works by the Steve-McClellan-led Diverse and Emerging Music Association (DEMO). And if all goes smoothly, operations could begin at a vacant Longfellow elementary school as soon as this winter.

The McClellan Center for Music would build on the legacy that Steve McClellan—pictured above with Tetes Noires in the mid-80s—created during his nearly 30-year tenure as the general manager at First Avenue and the past 14 years he’s spent lobbying for underrepresented and emerging talent through the DAMF (which he started when he was still at First Ave) and DEMO, which he launched when he parted ways with the club in 2004.

read more

  1. Camera: Canon MP520 series