Last piece of Met Stadium torn down

The last standing piece of Metropolitan Stadium was taken down on Monday morning.

The “East” parking sign was located in the North parking lot at Mall of America. It was the final piece of decades of Minnesota history that took place at Met Stadium.

The sign will be donated to the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation to be auctioned off in support of Type 1 Diabetes research.
via KARE11, top photo by me from a blog post I did last July about the old Met Center/Stadium East parking sign. Last piece of Met Stadium torn down

The last standing piece of Metropolitan Stadium was taken down on Monday morning.

The “East” parking sign was located in the North parking lot at Mall of America. It was the final piece of decades of Minnesota history that took place at Met Stadium.

The sign will be donated to the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation to be auctioned off in support of Type 1 Diabetes research.
via KARE11, top photo by me from a blog post I did last July about the old Met Center/Stadium East parking sign.

Last piece of Met Stadium torn down

The last standing piece of Metropolitan Stadium was taken down on Monday morning.

The “East” parking sign was located in the North parking lot at Mall of America. It was the final piece of decades of Minnesota history that took place at Met Stadium.

The sign will be donated to the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation to be auctioned off in support of Type 1 Diabetes research.

via KARE11, top photo by me from a blog post I did last July about the old Met Center/Stadium East parking sign.

Elvis Presley - Concert Review clip - From his 11-5-1971 show in Minneapolis Minn.

The spotlights stabbed down at a figure in a tight, spangled suit, a guitar twanged, and the capacity crowd in Metropolitan Sports Center burst into sound and light. Elvis Presley was on stage. Flashbulbs (nearly 100 can be counted in this 3-second exposure) popped almost continuosly as Presley performed the songs that made him famous in the 1950s and sang some new ones.

via rockinred1969

10-16-85 Dio @ Met Center, Bloomington, MN by NYCDreamin

This Is It

Like a lone sentry standing guard over memories long past, this “East” parking lot sign is the last relic of the Met Center, a building that brought hundreds of thousands of Minnesotans through it’s doors over the years. The IKEA store in the background is where Met Center stood from 1967, until it was imploded on December 13, 1994. Primarily famous for being the home of the Minnesota North Stars NHL team, it also hosted concerts by the likes of Frank Sinatra, KISS, Michael Jackson, and the first ever performance of Sesame Street Live.

I bet “East” could tell you some tailgating/after concert stories that would make your head spin, while at the same time making you wish so hard that you could travel back in time and be there, for just one night.

But this is all that’s left.

Because I love you guys, here is the setlist from when AC/DC played Met Center on November 23, 1981 on their “For Those About To Rock” tour.

1.Hells Bells
2.Shot Down in Flames
3.Sin City
4.Shoot to Thrill
5.Back in Black
6.Bad Boy Boogie
7.Rock and Roll Ain’t Noise Pollution
8.The Jack
9.What Do You Do For Money Honey
10.Highway to Hell
11.Dirty Deeds Done Dirt Cheap
12.Whole Lotta Rosie
13.Let There Be Rock
Encore:
14.You Shook Me All Night Long
15.For Those About to Rock (We Salute You)
16.T.N.T.

  1. Camera: LG Electronics LG-E739
  2. Aperture: f/2.8
  3. Focal Length: 4mm

The Dark Side Of Minneapolis - The Death Of Minnesota North Star Bill Masterson

Across the street from Mall of America in the area where IKEA and overflow mall parking meet, once stood The Met Center, home of the Minnesota North Stars from 1967-1993. The North Stars joined the NHL as an expansion team in 1967 and the first player they signed was Winnipeg native and University of Denver All-American, Bill Masterson. Masterson had been out of hockey for a few years and was living in Minneapolis while working for Honeywell when the North Stars bought his rights from the Montreal Canadians, thereby making him the first player under contract for the Minnesota North Stars. Masterton also scored the first goal in the regular-season history of the North Stars, on October 11, 1967 at St. Louis in a 2-2 tie with the Blues.

Tragedy struck the team during the first season on January 13, 1968, when forward Bill Masterton suffered a fatal hit during a game against the Oakland Golden Seals at Met Center. In the first four minutes of the game, skating towards the Seals goal across the blue line, Masterton was checked by an Oakland defenseman after passing the puck, then fell backwards, hitting the back of his head on the ice, rendering him unconscious. Quickly attended by two doctors, Masterson was taken from the ice on a stretcher and transported to Fairview Southdale Hospital. The following day’s paper reported that, as of late Sunday night, Masterson remained in critical condition, attended by five doctors, two of them neurosurgeons. The newspaper explained that no one was quite certain what had happened on the play. The game had been televised in Oakland, but the incident wasn’t shown on camera.

At 1:55 A.M. on Monday January 15, 1968, at the age of 29 - thirty hours after being injured and have never regained consciousness, Masterson died.

To this date, this remains the only death as a result of an injury during a game in NHL history. The North Stars retired his jersey, and later that year, hockey writers established the Bill Masterton Memorial Trophy which would be given annually to a player who best exemplifies the qualities of perseverance, sportsmanship and dedication to hockey. Following the news of Masterton’s death, the North Stars lost the next six games.

The photo on this post is from the Toronto Star, and much of the information was found in the book “75 Memorable Moments in Minnesota Sports” by Joel A. Rippel.