Betty Danger’s to take over former Psycho Suzi’s space

The owner of Psycho Suzi’s has proposed a new restaurant called Betty Danger’s Country Club for the tikki bar’s first home in Northeast at Lowry and Marshall — a venue that would include a Ferris wheel.

According to a letter circulated in the Marshall Terrace neighborhood, Betty Danger’s would feature a Tex-Mex menu with a Minnesota influence as well as a full bar. Keeping with the country club theme, attractions at the restaurant would include a mini-golf course complete with pro shop, as well as a dine-on-Ferris wheel which would offer views of the Mississippi River, the Lowry Bridge and the downtown skyline.

via Journal MPLS

Psycho Suzi’s Puppy Fashion Show

1st Annual Puppy Fashion Show! Saturday at 2pm.

- Best in Show Prizes include: $200 cash, 5 days of training at Ruff Love, and a basket with over $200 in puppy gifts & Suzi’s gear
- Prizes will also be awarded to 2nd, 3rd, & 4th place
- Home-made costumes & fancy hairdos encouraged!
- Limited spots, so register early by calling 612.788.9069

Don’t have a pup?
- Not to worry! Pet Project Rescue will be bringing some.
- Also, Puppy Kissing Booth

James Beard Foundation: Kramarczuk’s is an “America’s Classics”

The James Beard Foundation has reaffirmed what Twin Citians have known for years. Namely, that Kramarczuk’s is worthy of joining the fraternity of “America’s Classics.”

The culinary foundation announced today that the northeast Minneapolis landmark is the recipient of one of five annual “America’s Classics” honors, which are given to restaurants “that have timeless appeal and are beloved for quality food that reflects the character of their community.”

What a fitting tribute to the source for cabbage rolls, dumplings, sauerkraut-smothered house-made sausages, savory crepes topped with horseradish-fortified sour cream, kielbasa, bratwurst (an iconic Target Field favorite) kolaches and other trademark menu items, all of which have been luring hungry Minnesotans to northeast Minneapolis for nearly 60 years.

via StarTribune

Fourth Annual Dagos at Dusty’s on Groundhog Day Bash!

Who: You
What: Beer and Dago Sandwiches
Where: Dusty’s Bar in Nordeast Minneapolis (1319 Marshall St NE, right by the old Grain Belt Brewery)
When: Groundhog Day, this Saturday (Feb 2), starting about 7PM
Why: No one else celebrates Groundhog Day in the Twin Cities, we’ve been doing this for four years now, and it is pretty awesome.

FAQS:

Is this an official tumblr event?
Kinda, Andy has tumblr stickers for us, so, there you go.

Do I have to have a tumblr blog to come?
No, at it’s heart, this is the most kick-ass social media event to happen every year on Groundhog Day in the Twin Cities.

Do I need to be 21?
Nope, just old enough to party. But of course, 21 for “adult” drinks.

I really don’t know any of you people, and some of you frighten me. Can I bring a friend?
Of course.

Is there a table reserved, does Dusty’s know you’re coming?
Nope, we just show up and take over the place.

How late will you be at Dusty’s?
All night? Although some folks will start their night at Dusty’s, and venture over to other bars in Nordeast as the night goes on. I know at some point I want to wander over to Dangerous Man Brewing and pick up a growler of something.

So, do I just show up and say “Hi” to someone with a tumblr sticker?
Yes. This night is all about beer, Dago sandwiches, and nerdy social media fellowship.

Hope to see you there!!

Groundhog image by ewaldmario

Minneapolis Then And Now: Fire in northeast Minneapolis, near Minneapolis Brewing Company 1893/2012

The biggest fire in Minneapolis history occurred just over 100 years ago, on August 13, 1893. It burned 23 square blocks of the city, more than 150 buildings, and acres of stacked lumber. Although not as costly as the 1982 Norwest Bank fire, nor as tragic as the 1940 Marlborough Hotel fire, it remains the largest conflagration the MFD ever faced. Curiously, it is not well remembered.. No monuments mark its boundaries; it is seldom recalled when large fires of the past are cited. Only the old Grain Belt brewery remains among the buildings that survived the fire. 

It broke out on a hot, windy, Sunday afternoon in a dry summer that had seen no rain fall for a month before the blaze. Boys smoking set fire to the two-story, frame plant of the Lenhart Wagon Works on the west side of Nicollet Island, south of present East Hennepin Avenue.

The conflagration of 1893 destroyed 23 square blocks containing four factories, five saw mills, a planing mill, a brewery bottling house, malt house, and stables, four ice houses, two stables, a workers’ dormitory, 103 houses, more than 50 dry kilns, sheds, barns, and outbuildings, 50 million feet of stacked lumber, and several blocks of wood and slab yards. Its $975,582 loss, for more than 50 years the highest on record in the city, would be perhaps 20 times that figure in modern dollars. No fire since has come close to burning as large an area of the city as did the conflagration of 1893. No fire in the department’s 135-year history came closer to overwhelming the city’s fire defenses. 

Companies remained or returned to the scene for a week to fight fires and rekindles in lumber and sawdust piles, trees, and rubble. About 200 residents burned out of their homes sheltered in churches and lodge halls. For months after the blaze, the devastated district remained bare land save for the ruins of a few masonry buildings. It was never rebuilt as a saw milling center: west side saw mills had sufficient excess capacity for future lumber production. The Soo Line railroad soon bought the northeast district for railroad yards, but these also remained unbuilt. Eventually, smaller lumber yards, a planing mill, and a woodenware plant occupied the area. It is now the site of the Graco Corporation’s headquarters and Scherer Brothers Lumber Company. Boom Island and the tip of Nicollet Island where the conflagration started are now handsome riverfront parks. 

Photos by Me, and the Minnesota Historical Society. To read the full story of the fire, go to the Extra Alarm Association website. Minneapolis Then And Now: Fire in northeast Minneapolis, near Minneapolis Brewing Company 1893/2012

The biggest fire in Minneapolis history occurred just over 100 years ago, on August 13, 1893. It burned 23 square blocks of the city, more than 150 buildings, and acres of stacked lumber. Although not as costly as the 1982 Norwest Bank fire, nor as tragic as the 1940 Marlborough Hotel fire, it remains the largest conflagration the MFD ever faced. Curiously, it is not well remembered.. No monuments mark its boundaries; it is seldom recalled when large fires of the past are cited. Only the old Grain Belt brewery remains among the buildings that survived the fire. 

It broke out on a hot, windy, Sunday afternoon in a dry summer that had seen no rain fall for a month before the blaze. Boys smoking set fire to the two-story, frame plant of the Lenhart Wagon Works on the west side of Nicollet Island, south of present East Hennepin Avenue.

The conflagration of 1893 destroyed 23 square blocks containing four factories, five saw mills, a planing mill, a brewery bottling house, malt house, and stables, four ice houses, two stables, a workers’ dormitory, 103 houses, more than 50 dry kilns, sheds, barns, and outbuildings, 50 million feet of stacked lumber, and several blocks of wood and slab yards. Its $975,582 loss, for more than 50 years the highest on record in the city, would be perhaps 20 times that figure in modern dollars. No fire since has come close to burning as large an area of the city as did the conflagration of 1893. No fire in the department’s 135-year history came closer to overwhelming the city’s fire defenses. 

Companies remained or returned to the scene for a week to fight fires and rekindles in lumber and sawdust piles, trees, and rubble. About 200 residents burned out of their homes sheltered in churches and lodge halls. For months after the blaze, the devastated district remained bare land save for the ruins of a few masonry buildings. It was never rebuilt as a saw milling center: west side saw mills had sufficient excess capacity for future lumber production. The Soo Line railroad soon bought the northeast district for railroad yards, but these also remained unbuilt. Eventually, smaller lumber yards, a planing mill, and a woodenware plant occupied the area. It is now the site of the Graco Corporation’s headquarters and Scherer Brothers Lumber Company. Boom Island and the tip of Nicollet Island where the conflagration started are now handsome riverfront parks. 

Photos by Me, and the Minnesota Historical Society. To read the full story of the fire, go to the Extra Alarm Association website.

Minneapolis Then And Now: Fire in northeast Minneapolis, near Minneapolis Brewing Company 1893/2012

The biggest fire in Minneapolis history occurred just over 100 years ago, on August 13, 1893. It burned 23 square blocks of the city, more than 150 buildings, and acres of stacked lumber. Although not as costly as the 1982 Norwest Bank fire, nor as tragic as the 1940 Marlborough Hotel fire, it remains the largest conflagration the MFD ever faced. Curiously, it is not well remembered.. No monuments mark its boundaries; it is seldom recalled when large fires of the past are cited. Only the old Grain Belt brewery remains among the buildings that survived the fire.

It broke out on a hot, windy, Sunday afternoon in a dry summer that had seen no rain fall for a month before the blaze. Boys smoking set fire to the two-story, frame plant of the Lenhart Wagon Works on the west side of Nicollet Island, south of present East Hennepin Avenue.

The conflagration of 1893 destroyed 23 square blocks containing four factories, five saw mills, a planing mill, a brewery bottling house, malt house, and stables, four ice houses, two stables, a workers’ dormitory, 103 houses, more than 50 dry kilns, sheds, barns, and outbuildings, 50 million feet of stacked lumber, and several blocks of wood and slab yards. Its $975,582 loss, for more than 50 years the highest on record in the city, would be perhaps 20 times that figure in modern dollars. No fire since has come close to burning as large an area of the city as did the conflagration of 1893. No fire in the department’s 135-year history came closer to overwhelming the city’s fire defenses.

Companies remained or returned to the scene for a week to fight fires and rekindles in lumber and sawdust piles, trees, and rubble. About 200 residents burned out of their homes sheltered in churches and lodge halls. For months after the blaze, the devastated district remained bare land save for the ruins of a few masonry buildings. It was never rebuilt as a saw milling center: west side saw mills had sufficient excess capacity for future lumber production. The Soo Line railroad soon bought the northeast district for railroad yards, but these also remained unbuilt. Eventually, smaller lumber yards, a planing mill, and a woodenware plant occupied the area. It is now the site of the Graco Corporation’s headquarters and Scherer Brothers Lumber Company. Boom Island and the tip of Nicollet Island where the conflagration started are now handsome riverfront parks.

Photos by Me, and the Minnesota Historical Society. To read the full story of the fire, go to the Extra Alarm Association website.

Minneapolis Then And Now: Louis Gluek residence, 2004 Marshall Street Northeast 1915/2012

The mansion was located next to the Gluek Brewery, near where Psycho Suzi’s is now, on an area called Gluek Park today. The mansion and the brewery were torn down around 1966.

Photos by me, and the Minnesota Historical Society Minneapolis Then And Now: Louis Gluek residence, 2004 Marshall Street Northeast 1915/2012

The mansion was located next to the Gluek Brewery, near where Psycho Suzi’s is now, on an area called Gluek Park today. The mansion and the brewery were torn down around 1966.

Photos by me, and the Minnesota Historical Society

Minneapolis Then And Now: Louis Gluek residence, 2004 Marshall Street Northeast 1915/2012

The mansion was located next to the Gluek Brewery, near where Psycho Suzi’s is now, on an area called Gluek Park today. The mansion and the brewery were torn down around 1966.

Photos by me, and the Minnesota Historical Society

Kramarczuk’s Kielbasa Festival, Sept 7th & 8th


Click pic for deets.

Today’s lunch was brought to by “The Suzi Burger” at Psycho Suzi’s.

According to the menu, the Suzi Burger is… A secret blend of beef, butter, and seasoning, topped with caramelized
onion, provolone cheese, and red pepper mayo.

As with any time I do a “food review”, I always tell you to go to The Heavy Table, and for those of you in the south metro, Lazy Lightning by Bill Roehl, is another favorite blog of mine that mixes in some solid restaurant reviews.

So.

This was a very tasty burger, you guys. And they serve it with tots.

TOTS!

Today’s lunch was brought to by “The Suzi Burger” at Psycho Suzi’s.

According to the menu, the Suzi Burger is…
A secret blend of beef, butter, and seasoning, topped with caramelized
onion, provolone cheese, and red pepper mayo.

As with any time I do a “food review”, I always tell you to go to The Heavy Table, and for those of you in the south metro, Lazy Lightning by Bill Roehl, is another favorite blog of mine that mixes in some solid restaurant reviews.

So.

This was a very tasty burger, you guys. And they serve it with tots.

TOTS!

  1. Camera: LG Electronics LG-E739
  2. Aperture: f/2.8
  3. Focal Length: 4mm

612 Brew Tap Room Tour by DJR Architecture

Find more info at 612 Brew

Snail on a mushroom, Minneapolis by Lorika13