Betty Danger’s to take over former Psycho Suzi’s space

The owner of Psycho Suzi’s has proposed a new restaurant called Betty Danger’s Country Club for the tikki bar’s first home in Northeast at Lowry and Marshall — a venue that would include a Ferris wheel.

According to a letter circulated in the Marshall Terrace neighborhood, Betty Danger’s would feature a Tex-Mex menu with a Minnesota influence as well as a full bar. Keeping with the country club theme, attractions at the restaurant would include a mini-golf course complete with pro shop, as well as a dine-on-Ferris wheel which would offer views of the Mississippi River, the Lowry Bridge and the downtown skyline.

via Journal MPLS

St. Paul Pioneer Press Gives Love to Northeast Minneapolis

Northeast Minneapolis: Your guide to the vibrant arts district

For many, a love affair with Northeast Minneapolis is more than a fling — especially when it comes to art.

Buildings throughout the area house hundreds of loft and gallery spaces for shopping local art. The Northeast Minneapolis Arts Association alone has more than 700 members, who feature clothing, jewelry, artisan skincare, apothecary, pottery, artwork and more. The holidays are an especially popular time of year, when visitors come to shop for gifts. The dining scene offers just as much variety.

Read the rest of the article here… Pioneer Press

  1. Camera: Nikon D300
  2. Aperture: f/2.8
  3. Exposure: 1/80th
  4. Focal Length: 24mm

GPOY At A Historic Celebration

Minneapolis Then And Now: Fire in northeast Minneapolis, near Minneapolis Brewing Company 1893/2012

The biggest fire in Minneapolis history occurred just over 100 years ago, on August 13, 1893. It burned 23 square blocks of the city, more than 150 buildings, and acres of stacked lumber. Although not as costly as the 1982 Norwest Bank fire, nor as tragic as the 1940 Marlborough Hotel fire, it remains the largest conflagration the MFD ever faced. Curiously, it is not well remembered.. No monuments mark its boundaries; it is seldom recalled when large fires of the past are cited. Only the old Grain Belt brewery remains among the buildings that survived the fire. 

It broke out on a hot, windy, Sunday afternoon in a dry summer that had seen no rain fall for a month before the blaze. Boys smoking set fire to the two-story, frame plant of the Lenhart Wagon Works on the west side of Nicollet Island, south of present East Hennepin Avenue.

The conflagration of 1893 destroyed 23 square blocks containing four factories, five saw mills, a planing mill, a brewery bottling house, malt house, and stables, four ice houses, two stables, a workers’ dormitory, 103 houses, more than 50 dry kilns, sheds, barns, and outbuildings, 50 million feet of stacked lumber, and several blocks of wood and slab yards. Its $975,582 loss, for more than 50 years the highest on record in the city, would be perhaps 20 times that figure in modern dollars. No fire since has come close to burning as large an area of the city as did the conflagration of 1893. No fire in the department’s 135-year history came closer to overwhelming the city’s fire defenses. 

Companies remained or returned to the scene for a week to fight fires and rekindles in lumber and sawdust piles, trees, and rubble. About 200 residents burned out of their homes sheltered in churches and lodge halls. For months after the blaze, the devastated district remained bare land save for the ruins of a few masonry buildings. It was never rebuilt as a saw milling center: west side saw mills had sufficient excess capacity for future lumber production. The Soo Line railroad soon bought the northeast district for railroad yards, but these also remained unbuilt. Eventually, smaller lumber yards, a planing mill, and a woodenware plant occupied the area. It is now the site of the Graco Corporation’s headquarters and Scherer Brothers Lumber Company. Boom Island and the tip of Nicollet Island where the conflagration started are now handsome riverfront parks. 

Photos by Me, and the Minnesota Historical Society. To read the full story of the fire, go to the Extra Alarm Association website. Minneapolis Then And Now: Fire in northeast Minneapolis, near Minneapolis Brewing Company 1893/2012

The biggest fire in Minneapolis history occurred just over 100 years ago, on August 13, 1893. It burned 23 square blocks of the city, more than 150 buildings, and acres of stacked lumber. Although not as costly as the 1982 Norwest Bank fire, nor as tragic as the 1940 Marlborough Hotel fire, it remains the largest conflagration the MFD ever faced. Curiously, it is not well remembered.. No monuments mark its boundaries; it is seldom recalled when large fires of the past are cited. Only the old Grain Belt brewery remains among the buildings that survived the fire. 

It broke out on a hot, windy, Sunday afternoon in a dry summer that had seen no rain fall for a month before the blaze. Boys smoking set fire to the two-story, frame plant of the Lenhart Wagon Works on the west side of Nicollet Island, south of present East Hennepin Avenue.

The conflagration of 1893 destroyed 23 square blocks containing four factories, five saw mills, a planing mill, a brewery bottling house, malt house, and stables, four ice houses, two stables, a workers’ dormitory, 103 houses, more than 50 dry kilns, sheds, barns, and outbuildings, 50 million feet of stacked lumber, and several blocks of wood and slab yards. Its $975,582 loss, for more than 50 years the highest on record in the city, would be perhaps 20 times that figure in modern dollars. No fire since has come close to burning as large an area of the city as did the conflagration of 1893. No fire in the department’s 135-year history came closer to overwhelming the city’s fire defenses. 

Companies remained or returned to the scene for a week to fight fires and rekindles in lumber and sawdust piles, trees, and rubble. About 200 residents burned out of their homes sheltered in churches and lodge halls. For months after the blaze, the devastated district remained bare land save for the ruins of a few masonry buildings. It was never rebuilt as a saw milling center: west side saw mills had sufficient excess capacity for future lumber production. The Soo Line railroad soon bought the northeast district for railroad yards, but these also remained unbuilt. Eventually, smaller lumber yards, a planing mill, and a woodenware plant occupied the area. It is now the site of the Graco Corporation’s headquarters and Scherer Brothers Lumber Company. Boom Island and the tip of Nicollet Island where the conflagration started are now handsome riverfront parks. 

Photos by Me, and the Minnesota Historical Society. To read the full story of the fire, go to the Extra Alarm Association website.

Minneapolis Then And Now: Fire in northeast Minneapolis, near Minneapolis Brewing Company 1893/2012

The biggest fire in Minneapolis history occurred just over 100 years ago, on August 13, 1893. It burned 23 square blocks of the city, more than 150 buildings, and acres of stacked lumber. Although not as costly as the 1982 Norwest Bank fire, nor as tragic as the 1940 Marlborough Hotel fire, it remains the largest conflagration the MFD ever faced. Curiously, it is not well remembered.. No monuments mark its boundaries; it is seldom recalled when large fires of the past are cited. Only the old Grain Belt brewery remains among the buildings that survived the fire.

It broke out on a hot, windy, Sunday afternoon in a dry summer that had seen no rain fall for a month before the blaze. Boys smoking set fire to the two-story, frame plant of the Lenhart Wagon Works on the west side of Nicollet Island, south of present East Hennepin Avenue.

The conflagration of 1893 destroyed 23 square blocks containing four factories, five saw mills, a planing mill, a brewery bottling house, malt house, and stables, four ice houses, two stables, a workers’ dormitory, 103 houses, more than 50 dry kilns, sheds, barns, and outbuildings, 50 million feet of stacked lumber, and several blocks of wood and slab yards. Its $975,582 loss, for more than 50 years the highest on record in the city, would be perhaps 20 times that figure in modern dollars. No fire since has come close to burning as large an area of the city as did the conflagration of 1893. No fire in the department’s 135-year history came closer to overwhelming the city’s fire defenses.

Companies remained or returned to the scene for a week to fight fires and rekindles in lumber and sawdust piles, trees, and rubble. About 200 residents burned out of their homes sheltered in churches and lodge halls. For months after the blaze, the devastated district remained bare land save for the ruins of a few masonry buildings. It was never rebuilt as a saw milling center: west side saw mills had sufficient excess capacity for future lumber production. The Soo Line railroad soon bought the northeast district for railroad yards, but these also remained unbuilt. Eventually, smaller lumber yards, a planing mill, and a woodenware plant occupied the area. It is now the site of the Graco Corporation’s headquarters and Scherer Brothers Lumber Company. Boom Island and the tip of Nicollet Island where the conflagration started are now handsome riverfront parks.

Photos by Me, and the Minnesota Historical Society. To read the full story of the fire, go to the Extra Alarm Association website.

Minneapolis Then And Now: Louis Gluek residence, 2004 Marshall Street Northeast 1915/2012

The mansion was located next to the Gluek Brewery, near where Psycho Suzi’s is now, on an area called Gluek Park today. The mansion and the brewery were torn down around 1966.

Photos by me, and the Minnesota Historical Society Minneapolis Then And Now: Louis Gluek residence, 2004 Marshall Street Northeast 1915/2012

The mansion was located next to the Gluek Brewery, near where Psycho Suzi’s is now, on an area called Gluek Park today. The mansion and the brewery were torn down around 1966.

Photos by me, and the Minnesota Historical Society

Minneapolis Then And Now: Louis Gluek residence, 2004 Marshall Street Northeast 1915/2012

The mansion was located next to the Gluek Brewery, near where Psycho Suzi’s is now, on an area called Gluek Park today. The mansion and the brewery were torn down around 1966.

Photos by me, and the Minnesota Historical Society

Art-A-Whirl 2012

Art-A-Whirl is the largest open-studio tour in the country. It’s a great opportunity to tour private artist studios and galleries, connect with the artists, and purchase original artwork.

Art-A-Whirl takes place annually in Northeast Minneapolis, the third weekend of May. This event is free and open to the public.

http://nemaa.org/art-a-whirl

Windom Park, Northeast Mpls via Urban Sketchers Twin Cities

Easter egg hunt, Logan Park, Broadway and Monroe, Minneapolis. (1923) by the Minnesota Historical Society

Cat Found in NE Mpls

Fellow tumblr Tamara McCoy sent me an email about a kitty that was found in Nordeast today…

A friend of mine found this cat today in NE Minneapolis near Boom Island Park. It is female, between 7-12 months, took her to the vet and she is healthy. Very sweet, loves lap sitting.Could you post her photo to see if anyone recognizes her OR would like to adopt her? 

If you recognize this cat (or maybe want to adopt), you can contact Tamara on her tumblr, or by email. tamara.morgen.mccoy@gmail.com

Cat Found in NE Mpls

Fellow tumblr Tamara McCoy sent me an email about a kitty that was found in Nordeast today…

A friend of mine found this cat today in NE Minneapolis near Boom Island Park. It is female, between 7-12 months, took her to the vet and she is healthy. Very sweet, loves lap sitting.
Could you post her photo to see if anyone recognizes her OR would like to adopt her?

If you recognize this cat (or maybe want to adopt), you can contact Tamara on her tumblr, or by email. tamara.morgen.mccoy@gmail.com